Digit Translation Wildcards

Use the following wild-cards in the String field in the Translation Entry pane.

Wild-cards:

Descriptions:

P or p

The digits represented by a P in the matched string can be either a 0 or 1. For example, the string P5088623000 will match either 05088623000 or 15088623000.

N or n

The digits represented by an N in the matched string can be any number between 2 and 9. For example, the string 508NN2N000 will match 5088623000, 5087724000, or any number that begins with 508, followed by two digits that can be any number between 2 and 9, followed by the number 2, followed by a single digit between 2 and 9 and ending with 000.

X,Y,Z or x,y,z

The digits represented by an X, Y, or Z in the matched string can be any digit. These wild-cards are interchangeable. However, X is generally preferred unless specifying various parts of a number. For example, you can specify the string XXXYYY1234 to indicate that the first three digits can be any value, the next three digits can be any value and the remaining digits must be 1234. This is useful for translation purposes. For example, if you use the match string XXXYYY1234 and the translation string YYY&, the DPE strips the first three digits (XXX) from the digit string.

V or v

The wildcard v will represent a Null String character. This can be used to insert an ANI when the incoming string is null. This does not support stripping the ANI to send a null string.

&

The ampersand (&) specifies that all remaining digits can have any value. For example, the match string 508& will match any digit string that begins with 508 such as 5088623000, 5087783000, or 5081234.

Generally you should always place the & at the end of the match string to indicate that all remaining digits can be of any value. However, the IMG supports match strings that include one character following an & as in 508&#. This enables you to strip a terminating digit or character.

#

The pound (#) character is generally used to terminate a digit string.

*

The asterisk (*) character is generally used to trigger a service, such as *70 to disable call waiting.

$

The wildcard ($) character will add the complete incoming (D)ialed String, (O)riginating String, or (G)eneric String when performing a translation. For Example: A call comes in with the (D)ialed number of 1234567890 and the customer wanted to translate it to a (G)eneric Number as 5551234567890 the Generic # Translation field would have an entry like the following: 555G$. See below for more information.

 

Note: Internally, the IMG maps the asterisk (*) character to a value of hexadecimal E and the pound (#) character to hexadecimal F. This can result in improper digit processing if your digit strings contain hexadecimal E or F. See the Digit 0x0a to 0x0f Support link below for more information.

 

$ Wildcard Character

A new wildcard character known as the dollar character ($) has been added to the IMG for software version 10.5.3. The wildcard ($) character will add the complete incoming (D)ialed String, (O)riginating String, or (G)eneric String when performing a translation. G for Generic, O for Originating, and D for Dialed numbers, has to be specified when using the Dollar ($) wildcard character. See Below.

Example 1

  1. A call comes into the IMG with the Originating Number specified as 6677889900. The Outgoing Generic Number will have 12345 with the Originating Number added to the end. The Generic Number Translation field within the Translation Entry will look like the following:

    sc_f5043_example1.png
  2. The Value of the outgoing Generic Address Parameter will be 123456677889900

Example 2

  1. A call comes into the IMG Originating Number specified as 334455 and the Generic Number specified as 667788. The Outgoing Dialed Number parameter should equal the concatenated Originating Number + Generic Number. The Dialed number coming into the IMG is 112233. The Translation entry will look like the following:

    sc_f5043_example2.png
  2. The Value of the outgoing Dialed Number Parameter will be 334455667788

 

Additional Information on $ wildcard

Related Topics

Digit 0x0a to 0x0f Support